Category Archives: Organizations

Stop the Sludge/Support Six Nations Land Defenders–> Hamilton Event

STOP THE SLUDGE! SUPPORT SIX NATIONS LAND DEFENDERS! Speaking Tour
Friday June 29th
7-9 @ Corktown HARRP (187 James St. South)

Join us to learn about struggles to stop the sludge plant at the Headwaters of the Grand River and how to support Six Nations activists who are being criminalized for defending their land.  Speakers from Six Nations and Dundalk share their experiences, followed by an opportunity for discussion.

STOP THE SLUDGE!
How would you like to eat food that was fertilized with hazardous human waste? What if that same waste leaks into our local rivers?

In the lead-up to a July 7th walk in Dundalk, Ontario, to show the growing and united opposition being mobilised against these dangerous developments at the headwaters of the Grand and Saugeen rivers, we will be joined by James Cooke of citizen groups Stop the Waste Park (http://www.stopthewastepark.com/) and the Southgate Public Interest Research Group (http://opirg.org/southgate/home.html).  During this public info night we will learn about the unfolding events and struggles against a dangerous project to build a new waste processing (‘sludge’) plant at the headwaters of the Grand River, as well as resistance to this project from those at the frontline of this environmental struggle.

The story on the sludge plant:

In February 2012, residents of Southgate township and the town of Dundalk, Ontario drove their vehicles onto the access road leading to a construction site. The so-called “eco-park”, located near a school at the edge of town, was to be developed into a sludge-to-fertilizer processing plant.

This land protection action, 145km northwest of Hamilton, Ontario at the head waters of the Grand River (O:se Kenhionhata:tie), has stopped construction of the plant which would have processed the human sewage, industrial and medical waste that would be shipped in from Toronto. The out-sludge would then be sprayed on fields as fertilizer for our food.

With the support of Haudenosaunee land defenders, and a mobilized and highly knowledgeable local community, the blockade’s energy and strength continues to grow and there is grounds for optimism about the impending court date in July which would see the zoning rules disallow further development.

Check out the AW@L Radio interview with Ruby Montour (Haundenosaunee elder, land defender and Grandmother) and Dundalk resident James Cook (Southgate Public Interest Research Group), who have been blockading further development of the site, in a bold and brave land protection effort: http://rabble.ca/podcasts/shows/awl/2012/05/stop-waste-park

For more information on the proposed sludge plant, and to hear plans of ongoing and upcoming actions on this water issue, visit:

– http://stopthewastepark.com/

– https://www.facebook.com/pages/STOP-the-Bio-Solids-Plant-from-Being-In-a-Town-or-near-Housing/282799498412223

SUPPORT SIX NATIONS LAND DEFENDERS!


On June 25, the April 28 Coalition kicked off a speaking tour in Toronto with the  launch of a new Six Nations Land Defenders Legal Defence Fund to support front line Haudenosaunee land defenders who have been criminalized and targeted by the state.

Francine “Flower” Doxtator is a Haudenosaunee Land Defender, grandmother and a member of the April 28 Coalition from Six Nations. She will be in court on June 26 in Cayuga to continue dealing with charges stemming from a February 18 incident at Kanonhstaton, the Six Nations reclamation site near Caledonia, where she and others confronted racist agitator Gary McHale’s planned incursion onto the site known as “the Protected Place.” She was later recharged for allegedly breaching unjust bail conditions when she attended the April 28 walk for “Peace, Respect and Friendship,” where people from Six Nations marched with allies under the banner, “We Are All Treaty People.” For more information on Flower’s case see: april28coalition.wordpress.com.

At Six Nations, the last six years have seen harsh criminalization of Haudenosaunee Land Defenders. Dozens of people have faced criminal charges and several have served substantial time in jail. In Brantford an injunction was passed making it illegal for anyone from Six Nations to be involved in land claims protest within the city; in Flower’s case we see further criminalization of land defenders with bail conditions that attempt to keep her away from already reclaimed land.

We are reminded of our collective strength and the potential for support within activist communities when over the last two years unprecedented levels of support has been generated for the G20 defendants and some of those convicted and that currently there are massive outpourings of solidarity and support to the legal defense funds of Quebec student associations. It is important to remember that the same level of financial and physical support has not arisen for Indigenous Land Defenders and other front line struggles. This needs to change.

We must continue to build support for Six Nations land defenders and other everyday struggles against colonization. We must also remember that all of us living on the land are treaty people, and we as treaty people must work to overcome these outrageous and heart breaking violations of treaty and human rights by building support for our friends and allies at Six Nations.

This event has been organized by Hamilton members of the April 28th coalition.

If you have questions about other work the April 28 Coalition is doing, please contact: april28info@gmail.com

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Filed under April 28 Coalition, Court Support, Development, Environoment, Hamilton, Injunctions, Political Prisoners, Six Nations Land defenders Legal Defence Fund

June 25 + 26: Solidarity with Six Nations Land Defenders

The April 28 Coalition would like to invite you to a speaking event to launch the new Six Nations Land Defenders Legal Defence Fund, followed by a day of court support for Francine “Flower’ Doxtator and Alex Hundert.

On June 25, the April 28 Coalition will be launching a new Six Nations Land Defenders Legal Defence Fund to support front line Haudenosaunee land defenders who have been criminalized and targeted by the state. We will be hosting a speaking event that evening to which you are invited.

On June 26, Francine “Flower” Doxtator and Alex Hundert will both be in court, in Cayuga and Toronto respectively. The April 28 Coalition would like to invite you to attend both court hearings, and for a bus ride to and from Cayuga for Flower’s afternoon hearing

Launch Event for Six Nations Land Defenders Legal Defence Fund, Speaking event with Francine “Flower” Doxtator, Alex Hundert, more speakers TBA

  • 6pm,  June 25 – San Lorenzo Latin American Community Centre, 22 Wenderly Drive, Toronto

Court support for Alex Hundert, G20 Main Conspiracy Group, sentencing hearing: Alex is expecting to start a 13.5 month jail sentence.

  • 10am, June 26 – Metro West Etobicoke Courthouse, 2201 Finch W

Get on the bus to Cayuga: Support Flower and Six Nations Land Defenders

  • 12:30pm – 2201 Finch W, Toronto
  • UPDATE: bus sign up

Court support for Francine “Flower” Doxtator, Six Nations Land Defender, grandmother, and a member of the April 28 Coalition.

  • 2pm – Cayuga Courthouse, 55 Munsee St N, Cayuga
  • Facebook Event: LINK

Francine “Flower” Doxtator is a Haudenosaunee Land Defender, grandmother and a member of the April 28 Coalition from Six Nations. She is in court on June 26 in Cayuga to continue dealing with charges stemming from a February 18 incident at Kanonhstaton, the Six Nations reclamation site near Caledonia, where she and others confronted racist agitator Gary McHale’s planned incursion onto the site known as “the Protected Place.” She was later recharged for allegedly “breaching” unjust bail conditions when she attended the April 28 walk for “Peace, Respect and Friendship,” where people from Six Nations marched with allies under the banner, “We Are All Treaty People.” For more info on Flower’s case see: april28coalition.wordpress.com

Alex Hundert, a long term Indigenous solidarity organiser and activist, was one of 21 people who were hit with a series of conspiracy charges related to planning for the Toronto G20 protests in the summer of 2010. The G20 Main Conspiracy Group and many other activists and organisers were the targets of one of the biggest policing/intelligence/security operations in Canadian history, as the state and the cops sought to smash a burgeoning network of anti-colonial, anti-capitalist, and anarchist activists and organisers across the country.  For more info on Alex’s case see: http://alexhundert.wordpress.com/

At Six Nations, the last six years have seen a harsh criminalisation of Haudenosaunee Land Defenders. Dozens of people have faced criminal charges, several have served substantial time in jail. In Brantford an injunction was passed, making it illegal for anyone from Six Nations to be involved in a land claims protest within the city; in Flower’s case, we see the further criminalization of land defenders with bail conditions that attempt to keep her away from already reclaimed land.

The G20 in Toronto saw an unprecedented mobilisation—including the June 24 Day of Action for Indigenous Sovereignty and Land Rights—followed by an unprecedented intelligence and security operation and crackdown on dissent. Alex Hundert and 20 others were hit with conspiracy charges as the state sought to criminalize the very acts of organising protests and promoting solidarity.

The intelligence/security operation targeted a growing network of social movements, particularly anarchists, migrant justice activists, and Indigenous sovereigntists and their allies. However this criminalization is nothing new; the state has always criminalized Indigenous, racialized, and poor communities, and especially the resistance movements that spring from them.

Over the last two years, some of the G20 defendants and some of those convicted have received unprecedented levels of support from the activist community—which only goes to show how much potential for support there is in our communities. Currently as the Quebec student strike receives massive outpourings of solidarity and huge contributions to their legal defense funds, it is important to remember that the same level of financial and physical support has not arisen for Indigenous Land Defenders and other front line struggles. This needs to change.

On June 25, come to the San Lorenzo Latin American Community Centre for a speaking event with Six Nations Land Defender Francine “Flower” Doxtator, solidarity activist and G20 “conspirator” Alex Hundert, and other speakers to be announced later. We will be launching a new Six Nations Land Defenders Legal Defence Fund and talking about the current state of land defense struggles at Six nations and the need for social justice movement solidarity with Indigenous struggles.

On June 26, come pack the courts for Flower and help send the message that we are all indeed “Treaty People,” and that we will support our allies and neighbours against the colonial practices of the Canadian state and the so-called justice system. It is time that Six Nations Land Defenders felt the full support of all of our social justice movements.

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Filed under April 28, April 28 Coalition, Cayuga, Court Support, Injunctions, Political Prisoners, Six Nations Land defenders Legal Defence Fund, Toronto

April 28 Report Back: Walking for Peace, Respect and Friendship along the Grand River

Honouring our historical agreements through shared action

by Dan Kellar, The Dominion, May 14

On April 28th 2012, a thousand Canadians from across Southern Ontario participated in the Walk, Rally, and Potluck for Peace, Respect, and Friendship and joined with Indigenous land defenders and families who are tired of the inaction and disrespect shown by all levels of Canadian government, to demand that Six Nations land rights be respected.

KITCHENER, ON—If you travel south along the winding 50-kilometres stretch of the Grand River between Kitchener and Caledonia, you will pass farms fields, forests, a sprawling patchwork of towns with their own industrial sites and golf courses, finally coming to the edge of the Six Nations reserve, and eventually, Kanonhstaton, the “protected place”—a site of Haudenosaunee land reclamation and defense. A brief walk from Caledonia’s downtown, the site is still identifiable by the downed hydro tower at the entrance just off the highway, and the skeleton of the trailer burned in early 2008 by a gang of anti-reclamation settlers.

Located on the boundary between the Six Nation reserve and the settler town of Caledonia, Kanonhstaton has brought Indigenous land rights to the forefront of national attention over and over again in the past six years, gaining prominence rarely seen in land occupations since the 1990 Oka standoff.

Kanonhstaton is about reclaiming the land and stopping a housing development known as the Douglas Creek Estates. The initial action by the group of around twenty, mostly woman Indigenous land defenders was met with little protest locally, and instead garnered widespread support from settler allies.

But on April 20, 2006, the Ontario Provincial Police carried out a violent raid on the site, during which OPP tore open tents, tasered, pepper sprayed, beat, and ultimately, arrested 16 Indigenous people. That day, hundreds from the reserve flooded to the site in response to the raid, ejected the police, and proceeded to build road blockades. Following this unsuccessful eviction attempt, groups of white settlers began organising citizen councils and anti-native and anti-reclamation rallies, under a call for a return to the “rule of law and order.”

read more

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On “keeping it local” and “keeping it peaceful” in Caledonia

blog post by Laura McDonald, Kitchener-Waterloo

Yesterday, I participated in a “Peace, Respect, and Friendship” celebration, including a march from Caledonia to Kanonhstaton, the reclamation site just outside of town, and a gigantic party including a bouncy castle, spoken word, speeches, music, and a gigantic potluck.

It was overwhelmingly – no, exclusively – positive. The event was wonderful. I find it bizarre that we needed to reassure people that it was going to be (and now, that it was) “positive” and “nonviolent”. It frustrates me that anyone would assume it wouldn’t be. But I will reassure you anyway: the onlyhositility I witnessed at all today was from people opposed to the event.

But I don’t want to talk about that.

While walking through Caledonia, I saw a restaurant with a sign saying “Keep it local. Keep it peaceful.” A friend of mine took this as a semi-positive thing – at least they were engaging with the issue in a not-overtly-hostile way. That’s a valid way of looking at it, for sure. I, however, saw it as representative of some pretty big misunderstandings that I want to address.

1. Keep it peaceful. I’ll do this one first because it’s easier (and because it’s not what I really want to talk about). Combined with the guy carrying the “anarchists go home” sign all over the place, I saw this as reflecting a common lack of understanding of who activists and anarchists are and what they do.

Always being told to make sure our protests are “peaceful” (and thus “valid”) takes away any agency that we have in just being peaceful because we were going to be anyway. It’s always a surprise that we were peaceful, or assumed that we were forced into being peaceful by the police presence. Like with the recent rainbow demo at UW, this assumption that we need to be told to be peaceful is really insulting and perpetuates a lot of dangerous myths about activism – and people in general. (It also perpetuates a lot of problematic ideas about what constitutes a valid form of protest or civic engagement, but that’s a whole ‘nother can of worms!)

More specifically, people apparently thought “G20 Anarchists” were going to come to town and smash windows. Um, what? If you know anything at all about anarchists, you know that’s an absurd (and I mean really absurd) thing to think with respect to this event. But most people don’t know very much about anarchists, and don’t try to. For the record, these “G20 Anarchists” were there. Some even played key roles in the explicitly peaceful event, because THIS (walk, make giant banners, prepare food for giant potlucks, arrange busses, show support, etc) is what they do, far more often than smashing windows.

I also think this “keep it peaceful” statement could reflect a fundamentally racist assumption (which is also, importantly, rooted in a complicated experience that I absolutely cannot speak to) that anything relating to Six Nations and the reclamation site is likely to NOT be peaceful. This is clearly wrong, and I hope today helped clear that up.

I think there are reasons people have these misguided notions, in both cases. I hope we can all keep working to dispel these illusions.

2. Keep it local. This statement was clearly directed at the hundreds of people who bussed in from other cities. This says “you don’t live here; you don’t understand; this isn’t your issue”. I fundamentally disagree with this argument pretty much across the board. Indigenous rights, environmental destruction, “development”, nuclear power, civil rights, human rights absuses, whatever – we are all affected and thus have a stake in these things no matter where they’re happening. It’s incredibly dangerous to think we can only fight for justice in our own communities, and we can’t let people tell us that’s how it should be. The boundaries that denote “local” issues are false, in many ways, and I think we all have the right (and duty) to have a say in things going on elsewhere and also to ask others to join in solidarity when dealing with so-called “local” conflicts, as non-native allies were asked to join today.

But in this case there’s also a much more specific reason this bothered me. This is what I want to talk about. While I get why people in Caledonia might feel this way, to an extent, I don’t think that many people (in Caledonia, or here on Facebook) understand that this is local for me. This is local for all of us. Yesterday wasn’t just about Caledonia, or Six Nations, or Kanonhstaton. This is about the entire Haudenosaunee territory, on which I live. On which many of the people who came to the event live. This is about all of the territories on which all of us live.

This event was about the treaties to which we are all beholden, and which we, as settlers, need to fight for, because they have not been upheld by our government, at any level, and it is our responsibility to change that. It is our responsibility to recognize the tremendous harm that has been done – and is still being done – by the immense and intentional dismissal of these treaties by the Canadian government.

We are all treaty people, and we need to start acting like it.

*for more photos from the event see http://toronto.mediacoop.ca/photo/marchrally-solidarity-six-nation-reclamation-april-28/10683

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Solidarity w Six Nations: Upcoming Events

Three upcoming events on Six Nations’ Grand River Territory

April 28: Walk and Gathering for Peace, Respect, and Friendship
Caledonia and Kanonhstaton, Six Nations Territory

April 29: Indigenous Sovereignty and Solidarity 101:
an introductory workshop
– Waterloo, WPIRG

May 4+5: Aboriginal Land Rights and the Rule of Law: book launch
Brantford, Caledonia, Ohsweken

April 28: Walk and Gathering for Peace, Respect, and Friendship

At 2 PM on Saturday, April 28, 2012 the Six Nations [Haudenosaunee] people of the Grand River territory and their allies will be holding a walk and rally for “Peace, Respect and Friendship.” The main focus of the event is to remind the Canadian people and the Canadian government that Six Nations land rights and treaties need to be respected.

(read more)

Get on the Bushttp://april28coalition.wordpress.com/our-transportation-registration-form/

April 29: Indigenous Sovereignty & Solidarity – 101: An Introductory Workshop

Waterloo, 2-5:30pm, Math & Community Building (MC), room 2034- University of Waterloo, WPIRG

(link)

The need to recognize indigenous sovereignty, land and treaty rights, and to root all of our intersectional struggles within a framework that incorporates anti-colonial perspectives, is increasingly understood to be a central feature of contemporary social and environmental justice work.

This series of workshops will introduce participants to the basics, as well as some of the complexities of engaging in indigenous solidarity work. Trainings will be interactive and will heavily utilize various popular education techniques, as well as some formal presentation.

All workshops are free, and open to both students and community members. Snacks and bus tickets will be provided, and childcare is available upon request.

Workshops will be held in the Math & Community Building (MC), room 2034- University of Waterloo. Registration is required.

Email tammy@wpirg.org to register.

May 4 and 5: Aboriginal Rights and the Rule of Law

Brantford, May 4, 7-9pm, WLU Odeon Theatre, 50 Market Street
Caledonia, May 5, 1-3pm, Haldimand Public Library, 100 Haddington St.
Ohsweken, May 5, 7-9pm, Old Council House, Fourth Line at Chiefswood.

You are invited to a book signing and author talk with University of British Columbia law student and author, Laura DeVries.

CONFLICT IN CALEDONIA:  Aboriginal Land Rights and the Rule of Law

About the book: Most people know that in 2006 an ongoing struggle in the communities of Caledonia, Brantford and Six Nations began. This book examines the way the conflict in Caledonia was publicly portrayed by those involved in its first two years. It asks why the conflict began, explores how it is linked to broader debates about Canadian law, citizenship and history, and offers ideas as to how the crisis could perhaps have been averted and why the government and Six Nations have been unable to reach resolution.

“I used chapters from this book in my third-year Indigenous history course. The book provides a wonderful analysis of the Caledonia situation.”
-Prof. Gary Warrick – Indigenous Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University, Brantford Campus.

FREE ADMISSION
More Information call T.R.U.E. c/o Jim Windle at 519-732-5700

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Respecting historic agreements with the Haudenosaunee and walking to Kanonhstaton for peace

AW@L Radio: A discussion with Luke Stewart

Rabble Podcast Network, 20 April 2012

LINK:  http://rabble.ca/podcasts/shows/awl/2012/04/respecting-historic-agreements-and-walking-peace-april28net-discussion-hi

Show Notes:

The feature of today’s show is our discussion with radical historian Luke Stewart on the upcoming Rally, Walk, and Community BBQ taking place on April 28th in Grand River Territory of the Six Nations, hosted by the April 28th Coalition (http://april28.net). This discussion looks at the the intentions of the event organizers (both indigenous and settler), respecting historical friendships and honouring our treaties (such as the Silver Covenant Chain, The Two Row Wampum, and the Haldimand Proclamation) and the resistance to the event from business interests and white citizens’ councils, among other topics.

– Check http://april28.net for more information about the upcoming rally, walk and community celebration in Caledonia and @Kanonhstaton, Southern Ontario.
– Audio of the invitations for this event Indigenous Land Protectors and their Settler Allies.
This podcast is part of the weekly 2-hour radio show AW@L Radio on CKMS 100.3 http://soundfm.ca from 16:00-18:00 on Fridays.
Check the whole episode at: http://peaceculture.org/drupal/radio/aw@lradio-2012-04-13-fe.mp3

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Frequently Asked Questions about the April 28th Walk for “Peace, Respect & Friendship”

Frequently Asked Questions about the April 28 Walk for “Peace, Respect and Friendship”

by Kanonhstaton Six Nations

Why are you having a walk for “peace, respect, and friendship” on April 28th?

Our peaceful walk and rally is about achieving real and lasting peace, respect, and friendship between native and non-native communities. We believe that in order for there to be peace, there must be justice. And in order for there to be justice, the wrongs that the Canadian government and the British Crown have committed against the people of Six Nations must be redressed. Our walk will draw attention to these is- sues. If we can resolve these issues we can create the basis for true and lasting peace, respect, and friendship between all communities.

What are these wrongs?

Six Nations was granted some 950 000 acres of land along the Grand River by the British Crown in the 1784 Haldimand proclamation. The document states that Six Nations “and their posterity are to enjoy [these lands] forever.” Six Nations was cheated out of much of this land, and on other parts of it they leased the land to non-natives, but they never received the lease money or their lands back. Corrupt government offi- cials stole from Six Nations, and money in the Six Na- tions trust funds held by the government was diverted for other purposes. Today, the people of Six Nations are upset to see developments taking place across their lands for which they receive no compensation or consultation.

Isn’t this march just “rubbing salt on old wounds”?

These are not “old wounds.” The wounds are fresh and are reopened every time that developers build on the Haldimand tract without seeking consultation and approval for their plans with the people of Six Na- tions. Unless the underlying issues are dealt with, the conflict could very easily spiral out of control as it did in Caledonia in 2006. As non-native members of the April 28 coalition, we are trying to bring pressure to bear on our elected leaders to resolve the underlying issues through negotiation and consultation so that new protests and confrontations over land develop- ment can be avoided.

Why did you decide to hold the march on April 28 when things are quieting down and returning to normal?

Caledonia will remain a powder keg until the underly- ing issues are resolved. On February 19, 2012, Gary McHale held a protest and marched onto the recla- mation site in an attempt to create a conflict situation. The next night, a young man from Caledonia tried to commit suicide by driving his car at full speed into the house on the reclamation site. He injured himself, totalled his car, damaged the house, and missed the gas line by about 6 inches. If he had hit the gas line, or if he had injured or killed somebody, the “Caledo- nia crisis” would have immediately escalated to 2006 levels again.

The events on the weekend of February 19th – 20th called our coalition into being and made us recognize the need to organize a peaceful and positive event on a scale that our politicians and the national media could not ignore. The root causes of the conflict need to be addressed if there is to be peace and friendship between our communities.

Why don’t you have the walk start on 6th Line and then have it walk around to the reclamation site?

The decision to start the walk at Edinburgh Square and end at the reclamation site rests in the symbolic importance of the route. Edinburgh Square stands on unceded Six Nations land in the middle of a non- native community, the walk over the Argyle St. bridge symbolizes the bridging of native and non-native com- munities, and the end point symbolizes a new begin- ning in native and non-native relations in the commu- nity. The route was chosen for very specific reasons and as the result of careful planning. The walk itself should only take around a half hour to complete and in working with Ontario Provincial Police we have en- sured that the route – and all people and businesses on it – will be safe and secure.

What do plans on the day look like?

We begin gathering at Edinburgh square at 2 PM. There will be a speaker from Caledonia and a speaker from Six Nations who will welcome participants to the rally and explain the peaceful guidelines under which we are operating. At 2:30 PM we will leave the square and begin walking up Argyle Street. Argyle Street will be closed to regular traffic for approximately half an hour. At 3 PM the walk will approach the reclamation site. Six Nations people at the site will line both sides of Surrey Street (the entrance to the site along High- way 6) and will shake the hands and personally wel- come people entering the site. From 3:15 PM to 4 PM there will be speeches from the stage. From 4 PM to 6 PM we will all enjoy live music, games such as la- crosse, dingball, and volleyball, the children will play in the bouncy castles rented for the event and we will share a massive pot luck dinner together.

Why should I come out to the event on April 28th ?

April 28 will be a wonderful and historic opportunity for genuine peace, friendship, and respect amongst all people in Caledonia, Six Nations, and the surround- ing area. The reclamation site will be open to all who come in the spirit of peace and friendship. You can make a real difference by coming to the event and by doing what you can to open lines of communication in friendship amongst the thousand or so native and non-native people that will be there. Bring some food, shake hands with your neighbours from Six Nations, and come together with us to demand that our gov- ernment take seriously the task of negotiating a just resolution to the issue of Six Nations land rights.

But don’t you need a permit from the municipality for a public event like this?

Caledonia Mayor Ken Hewitt has publicly requested that organizers submit a permit for this event, even though in private conversation with organizers he in- dicated that there is no way that his Council would ever approve a permit for the peace walk. Canadian law, however, is very clear about the power of mu- nicipal governments. They do not have the jurisdiction to override the democratic rights of free speech and public assembly enshrined in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Anyone seeking to exercise their democratic rights does not need the approval of their municipal government. This is a constitutionally protected right, not a privilege.

Aren’t you worried that the event will spark more conflict around this issue?

Our goal is to take pro-active steps to move this issue towards resolution. Efforts have been taken to miti- gate conflict and it is our belief that it would be more dangerous for us to not take a stand, especially in the context of the attempted suicide that happened when the young man drove his car into the house on the reclamation site on the night of February 20. We must take a stand and move beyond the status quo if this issue is to reach resolution and reconciliation is to occur.

How will you make sure that the event stays peaceful?

Event organizers have been liaising with Ontario Pro- vinicial Police to ensure the safety of all stakeholders in the community – those both on the walk and those opposed. The event also has a logistics and security team schooled in conflict resolution and focused on a peaceful and respectful walk. These marshals will be wearing arm bands on the day of the march and will be in communication with each other throughout. Also, protocol for the walk and the spirit of peaceful intentions has been communicated to all participants and will be repeated on buses as they approach the walk and again during the opening of the walk. We will not respond to provocations and we will not toler- ate violent or disruptive acts made by anyone walking with us.

How can I get in touch with the people organizing the April 28 event?

Phone: 905-481-0072 Email: april28info@gmail.com Website: http://www.april28.net

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